Thursday, 19 September 2013

"I Am Woman, Hear Me Roar! Then Take Away My Choices, I Shouldn't Have To Choose!"

Emmy Tither, 22, a former cycling instructor says: "Marketing for women should be done in the same way it's done for men. I wish it wasn't about being traditionally girly and making women look good in a heteronormative sense. I find it frustrating."
But since women are clearly buying the stuff in growing numbers, perhaps those marketers know what they are doing?
Marigold Hughes, 33, theatre producer and education manager, has cycled for eight years and was introduced to bikes by male friends and relatives. She doesn't choose women-specific products or women's frames and feels there should be a unisex approach to marketing and cycling products.
Ah. Of course. It's not enough that you simply chose something else, everyone else shouldn't have to do that!

They should be freed of the awful responsibility of having to make the choice you made!
When asked about cycling in general, she said: "It's still a very male-driven market, you go into bike shops which can be male-only places. When I've gone in I feel intimidated, it's this sacred kingdom you shouldn't be in."
What on earth do they do...? Grunt and scratch their balls?

Because whatever it is, it's clearly not working:
More and more women are turning to cycling – about 63,000 women took up cycling in the past year on the tailwind of the women's Olympic track and road team successes, according to British Cycling. It's time cycling companies learned how to market to them.
Why? They seem to be doing well enough!

11 comments:

DtP said...

Err...what? I wish my life was so sorted that I could go round even thinking let alone taking offence at such minor whatever the hell this is.

It reminds me of an episode of Frasier where he & his brother were having a perfect evening in a restaurant and both were quite depressed until the dessert arrived and the lemon wedge was just a little fat - never happy until there's something, however completely banal, to complain about.

Get a fricking' life!

Bucko The Moose said...

"I feel intimidated"

Problems to which, "Cowboy up!" is the answer.

Sobers said...

So an article with one general thrust (that there should be less stereotypical female advertising of cycles and cycling gear) uses as an example a woman who decries the current situation as 'too male' and demands more female centric marketing.

About par for the course at the Guardian I suppose. What a woman says is by definition right, even if two women make directly opposing statements (note this rule does not apply to Margaret Thatcher, or any woman who espouses right wing views, because they can be assumed to not be women).

Anonymous said...

Bunny

As a club cyclist (when I was in the UK at least) everybody went out of their way to make any lady who joined feel welcome. It didn't matter whether it was a touring or a racing club, it is what we did/do, however some of these people don't want to be made welcome or be treated equally. That's it, but it wouldn't make a Guardian whinge if they didn't feel some need to complain.

Probably haven't realised yet that sport and competition cycles use the diamond frame (a traditional male frame) for both sexes, why because it is the most efficient. so they want segregation again? Male only and Female only cycling clubs and shops. You can imagine Pankhurst tearing her hair out and going 'not in my name you useless bastards.'

Joe Public said...

"Emmy Tither …… says: "Marketing for women should be done in the same way it's done for men. I wish it wasn't about being traditionally girly and making women look good in a heteronormative sense. I find it frustrating.""

Ironic she used a word, one definition of which is 'sexually unfulfilled'.

John Pickworth said...

"... you go into bike shops which can be male-only places."

You could always give up your roll as theatre producer and education manager, and go work for a Halfords Cycle Centre? If the sister-hood means so much to you, perhaps you should? But then your ilk seem adept at sacrificing your principles if it means the loss of your comfortable state sponsored lifestyle.

James Higham said...

in a heteronormative sense

Puke.

Ranter said...

Dear God! What DtP said!

Ian Hills said...

How do you "feel" about your bike, girls? Is it like your hair - always needs a million things doing to it whenever a bloke says he likes it?

Perhaps it does need a new look, but don't ask a male shop assistant for advice unless he's gay, or you'll never take his opinion seriously.....

I can picture women spending a fortune getting their bikes tarted up, but once they get a puncture, it'll be "can oo help me mithter, I'm only a wiccle woman..."

Anonymous said...

Oh i know just how she feels. As a man i find it very hard to buy womens clothing for my transvestite evenings. Lingerie shops are still a female dominated environment and i find it intimidating.
Why can't silk and lace panties be unisex clothing?
(for the benefit of american agencies reading this....i am not really a transvestite....although i reckon i would look good...really good)

JuliaM said...

" I wish my life was so sorted that I could go round even thinking let alone taking offence at such minor whatever the hell this is. "

It's a calling, clearly!

"Problems to which, "Cowboy up!" is the answer."

Well, indeed! It doesn't seem to be stopping other women...

"...for both sexes, why because it is the most efficient."

Now, you won't get anywhere with facts and logic!

"You could always give up your roll as theatre producer and education manager, and go work for a Halfords Cycle Centre? If the sister-hood means so much to you, perhaps you should? "

No, no. She doesn't need to change - everyone else does!