Wednesday, 8 July 2009

Are You Nuts, Or Is It A ‘Cultural Norm’…?

So, it’s recommended that public sector workers like police, teachers, etc should be trained to spot early signs of possible mental illness. Who could object to that?

Oh, there’s always someone
A mental health group has criticised a report recommending police, teachers and other public sector workers should be trained to spot early signs of mental illness, saying it could marginalise those of black and minority ethnic backgrounds.
How, exactly?
The group claims that, if implemented, the recommendation could increase the chances of people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds being misdiagnosed by amateurs with no professional mental health credentials and lead to further stigmatisation.
Surely, it could increase the chances of everyone, not just black and minority people?
"There are grave concerns over the suggestion that the police or teachers should be trained in spotting signs of mental ill health," said Matilda MacAttram, of BMHUK. "Currently black men are six times more likely to be stopped and searched than their white counterparts, as such it is unwise to suggest that the police should be responsible for spotting signs of mental ill health. It could lead to catastrophic results."
Yes, really catastrophic. It could mean that people who need help will get it sooner. How terrible

But finally, we get to the meat of their concerns:
"There is a real danger that cultural norms could be misconstrued, which could have disastrous consequences for a child's educational career," she added.
No, I’ve no clue what ‘cultural norms’ happen to just look like insanity, and there’s nothing in this article to give anyone a clue.

9 comments:

Tom Paine said...

I am confused. Surely suggesting that the cultural norms of one group would seem mad to another is racism? Surely the idea that "black mental health" is different from "mental health" (and why would it need a separate pressure group, if not) is also racism?

This thought policing is jolly difficult, isn't it? It's enough to drive one mad.

ranter said...

On a practical note I used to use section 136 fairly often during my time as an agent of social control. The main problem was, and still is, access to proper assessment facilities and supposedly trained professional people i.e. mental health social workers and doctors in hospitals. Read Inspector Gadget's archived posts on this very subject.
Quite often very distressed and clearly ill people had to be detained for long periods in police cells whilst awaiting a place at a mental health ward or for someone who would attend and carry out an assessment. I never witnessed the power being abused by colleagues, in fact it was often the case that without police intervention the 'patient' could have suffered more distress and harmed themselves or someone else. I often formed the opinion that because of the poor resources mental health professionals often made things worse. At least the police 'were' there 24/7 and able to react rather than the one small lefty social worker covering an entire borough who when they did attend behaved like Mark Thomas on stage, one big boring marxist diatribe).
AS for the accusation that black people are deliberately targetted by police who use this power to ensure black people are locked up more easily, this is complete drivel. To be fair I encountered slightly more black people in using such powers but there are many reasons for this, not least because of societal factors - especially 30-40 years ago. As ever it shouldn't be the police's job to be all things to all people, however hard the ACPO Marxists try to ensure this happens. They are police officers not social engineers, doctors, paramedics, fire fighters, barristers etc.

Blue Eyes said...

The key point which is missing from this is that Afro-Caribbean males are SIX times more likely to suffer from mental illness than white males. Your point still stands though, surely discovering that you are mentally ill sooner rather than later aids the efficacy of any treatment. Or perhaps BMHUK is part of the "mental illness is just an alternative lifestyle" crew...

ranter said...

Good point by B-E. I also forgot to mention the number of times a Mental Health professional would tell me that the man I had brought to see them, the man in possession of a knife, wandering around jabbering to his voices, wasn't 'MAD', merely suffering from a personality disorder. Once charged and into the CJ system miraculously another professional would declare him insane and unfit to stand trial. I know why.

Rob said...

Great, oppose the police and the SS and now they can say your are mentally deranged.

JuliaM said...

"I am confused. Surely suggesting that the cultural norms of one group would seem mad to another is racism? Surely the idea that "black mental health" is different from "mental health" (and why would it need a separate pressure group, if not) is also racism?"

Getting harder and harder for them not to trip up over their own inconsistencies...

"I often formed the opinion that because of the poor resources mental health professionals often made things worse. At least the police 'were' there 24/7 and able to react rather than the one small lefty social worker covering an entire borough who when they did attend behaved like Mark Thomas on stage, one big boring marxist diatribe)."

And after 10 years of a Labour government, at least that's been reversed and the mental health services now have plenty of resources and...

Oh, wait!

"Or perhaps BMHUK is part of the "mental illness is just an alternative lifestyle" crew..."

It's a distinct possibility.

Anonymous said...

Is the treatment of mental disorders all that effective? early or otherwise.
Was there not the case recently when father was sectioned , mother arrested and child seized because the man thought his child needed protection from kidnapping.

JuliaM said...

"Was there not the case recently when father was sectioned , mother arrested and child seized because the man thought his child needed protection from kidnapping."

Rings a bell...

Anonymous said...

Give teachers a couple of days training and watch the number of children being 'diagnosed' with something that requires medication go through the roof.