Friday, 28 October 2016

“This is a tragic loss.”

So terribly, terribly tragic:
Tony Burry, 31, was found lying face down on his bed in the Canvey home he shared with his mother and her partner.
He had been collected from Chelmsford Prison on Wednesday, June 8 - the day before he died...
No, he didn't work there!
On the day of his death Mr Burry, who was prescribed methadone during his time in prison, went upstairs to his bedroom at about 5.30pm.
He spoke to a neighbour out of the window, who said he looked unwell.
Just 30 minutes later Mr Burry was found by a friend who had arrived at the house to visit him.
CPR was performed but he was pronounced dead.
Cigarettes, two used syringes and other drugs paraphernalia were found in the room. A post-mortem examination found the cause of death to be intoxication by heroin and cocaine...
*wipes away tears* Oh, it's like the death of Little Nell, isn't it?
Coroner Caroline Beasley-Murray, who gave her condolences to the family on the “loss of Tony in these tragic circumstances”, recorded his death as an accident.
There really needs to be a cause of death that covers these circumstances far more accurately...

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

No more stays in HMPS for him!

Bucko The Moose said...

I see they felt it necessary to point out that cigarettes were found along with the drugs and stuff.

Ed P said...

Yes, BtM, they missed an opportunity to blame the evil tobacco for his death (although I bet it was entered in his medical report).

Another DIA - Darwinism In Action, or dier, take your pick!

Anonymous said...

I'm going to be shot down for this but I was once working in a prison interviewing mainly 18-25 year olds who were convicted of drug-related offences. One was released on Friday and on Monday I was told that he'd been found dead from a drugs overdose by his five year old son on the Saturday. He wasn't the guy that you'd have wanted your daughter to bring home as her latest boyfriend but I found it tragic. These were people who'd been brought up in poverty, in fractured households etc etc (none of them were nice children whose parents couldn't understand what had happened), they didn't have the wherewithall to break free from their background and they knew full well that when they were released back into the community ferom which they'd come, they'd fall into crime again- they had no means of escape (literally - they didn't have the resources to start again somewhere else).

The person I had no sympathy for was a middle-aged, professional man who was imprisoned for a non-drug-related offence who showed absolutely no understanding of and no remorse for his crime.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps the middle-aged man was actually innocent.

Perhaps he was a member of a religious group for whom the crime wasn't a crime at all.

JuliaM said...

"I see they felt it necessary to point out that cigarettes were found along with the drugs and stuff."

Good spot!

"...but I found it tragic"

For the child, it was. Bad enough to lose a parent at a young age, but even worse to know that parent was a selfish individual with no self-control...

"...they had no means of escape (literally - they didn't have the resources to start again somewhere else)."

What resources are needed?