Wednesday, 12 November 2008

"Don't Bother Us With Real Cases, We're Busy Chasing Phantoms Here..."

Detectives investigating alleged cases of historical child abuse at a former children's home in Jersey are expected to say no children were murdered there.
Oh, dear. So this was yet another Orkney saga, was it, run up out of whole cloth by the child protection ‘experts’ who have so singularly failed ‘Baby P’ (a real case with plenty of real evidence, should anyone have bothered to act on it on any of those 60 seperate occasions)?

That won’t come as any shock to some people, of course. Or to me…
The detectives are expected to announce dozens of burnt bone fragments found in cellars could be hundreds of years old.

A Jersey police spokeswoman said the briefing would detail "significant developments in how the investigation would be taken forward".
To hell with the bone fragments! How old was the coconut…?

And while the usual suspects were drumming up hysteria and speculation based on little more of substance than Internet rumours, in Haringey, a bunch of scum were slowly torturing a toddler to death under the very noses of the authorities…

And in Devon, an inadequate mother was abandoning her young baby in scenes of squalor that made even policemen choke:
A two-year-old boy was left naked on his own in a filthy flat with no fresh food when his mother ran away because she could not cope, a court has heard.

The toddler's cries were heard by a postwoman at flats in east Devon.

Exeter magistrates were told the flat was littered with dirty nappies, there was human waste on the carpets and disposable razors on the floor.

5 comments:

Peter Horne said...

Brilliant blog, keep on sticking it to the useless fuckers.

JuliaM said...

Thank you.

Sad to say, I don't think they are going to stop providing me with opportunity any time soon....

woman on a raft said...

Stuart Syvret has the cross-reference files from the abuse survivors. Some of the have posted on line. The position is more like the Southall survivors in that some of them are not totally believable, but others of them unquestionably endured a very bad time at the hands of authorities, who for years wanted to pretend it had not happened. Islington, anyone?

With Jersey there is a historical dimension. The experience of occupation went very deep so that it is only in the last 15 years that things were faced up to. The result was that for at least 40 years there was a culture of secrecy which fostered some deeply unhealthy character traits, such as over-concern for image. The war had to be romanticised; they weren't ready to face the less flattering aspects of occupation by a clever and subtle enemy. If it hadn't been for the determination of my hero, the historian Joe Miere, some people would have liked the Jersey War Tunnels filled in and all references to WII quietly rubbed out.

To its very great credit, the States commissioned an analytical history for the Millenium* and the islanders finally thought that the bad days were behind them.

It was a horrible shock when rumours of child abuse began to surface in 2006. Jersais take religion seriously and have a conscientious 1950s outlook. I spoke to one resident who squirmed about and said it was probably right that things had to be brought in to the open, but at the same time they dreaded what would come out. The looked uncomfortable - like people who had heard things, but no actual evidence. It doesn't happen here, not on Jersey.

Harper jumped the gun, but considering the first-hand testimonies he had and the lax record keeping, it's not surprising that he thought he was on to something.

The Bailiff of Jersey is due to take early retirement. Health is usually given as the reason, but the fact is he fluffed it, attempting to suppress information instead of calmly and swiftly getting everything in the open. He was becoming a liability to the Crown.

Stuart Syvret's blog:

http://stuartsyvret.blogspot.com/

is heavy going - people carrying anything up to 50 years of grief don't tend to be brief, and Syvret is gobby and has a massive chip on his soft-communtarian shoulder. When he started to raise the issue he was dismissed as raving mad, in much the way Hodge attempted to discredit victims.

The essential point holds: abuse went on and it was covered up rather than censured.

*Paul Sanders. The British Channel Islands Under German Occupation 1940-45. A proper history book rather than cross-over journalism. Detailed, calm, painful but with very great care to try to tell it like it was, based on evidence.

JuliaM said...

"...others of them unquestionably endured a very bad time at the hands of authorities, who for years wanted to pretend it had not happened. Islington, anyone?"

Oh, I don't doubt some abuse went on. I think that kind of thing went on far more often in these big 'child care' institutions than anyone cares to admit.

But the hysterical reactions of the media and the professional child 'experts' ('House of horrors! Torture chambers!') would have you believe - as with the Orkney debacle - that mass murder was a routine occurence, after morning prayers and before lunch!

The fact that it happened on an island with the insularity and dark history of Jersey seems to have fuelled this too.

"If it hadn't been for the determination of my hero, the historian Joe Miere, some people would have liked the Jersey War Tunnels filled in and all references to WII quietly rubbed out."

I spent a week's holiday in Jersey many years ago - the Tunnel exhebition was a fascinating experiencve, and really well done. It brought home the occupation and what life must have been like very well.

"..the fact is he fluffed it, attempting to suppress information instead of calmly and swiftly getting everything in the open..."

It's never the original event that does for you. It's always the cover-up....

Tony Sharp said...

Excellent blog!