Saturday, 8 May 2010

Oh, Deer, RSPCA...

When the East Sussex Wildlife Rescue & Ambulance Service were called to rescue a fallow deer caught in a rope swing, they knew just what to do. Keep the animal calm by wrapping its head in a blindfold, and act quickly:
"Luckily the deer was unable to move far but we had to be very careful as you don't want to be kicked. As we approached the deer managed to pull the small tree stump out of the ground but, luckily, I was able to pin its antlers and shoulders to the ground and was swiftly joined by the others. Staff from Kit Wilson Trust cut the wire whilst the deer was pinned to the ground and secured" said Trevor.
When RSPCA inspector Sharon Chrisp was called to a young roebuck trapped in a fence, she knew just what to do too. Stand over the distressed animal taking pictures to pass to the MSM and make jokes about animal obesity:
RSPCA inspector Sharon Chrisp took a photograph of the deer in its predicament as she stood assessing the situation.

She said: 'According to local people this young deer was often seen in the grounds and would squeeze between the bars to get out.

'But he had obviously filled out more than he thought and when I arrived at the scene he was well and truly jammed in.

'He was unable to move either forward or backward and the expression on his face seemed to be more of embarrassment rather than anything else as he had managed to get his head through but then got stuck around the middle.'
Yes, embarrassment. That typically part of a deer's threat response mechanism, Sharon?

4 comments:

Mrs Rigby said...

"embarrassment"

That Beatrix Potter has a lot to answer for! She was the one who started anthropomorphising animals.

w/v = amacting

Mark Wadsworth said...

I think a deer is probably clever enough to feel embarrassed, actually. It does look a bit bashful, to say the least.

Hats off to the first deer for uprooting a tree though - I wouldn't have thought they were that strong.

John R said...

This Disney-esque view of wild animals underpins the madness that is the current UK public approach to wildlife.

Mr Fox is a jolly fellow, a bit of a "Jack The Lad", trhe sort of chap you'd have a pint with. He's not a predator, he doesnt kill a whole flock of birds but only eat a couple of victims.

Mr Badger is a wise sort of chap, very knowledgeable, one of the wise elders of the animal community. He doesnt carry TB and infect cattle flocks.

It's this bonkers cartoon/urban view that has allowed the previous(?) authoritarian government to pass laws that allow the RSPCA's little hitlers to have the right to enter your house and put you in jail for so-called cruelty. Meanwhile they let Baby Peter die because their nanny's can't do their job properly.

JuliaM said...

"That Beatrix Potter has a lot to answer for! "

Indeed! Never liked her in 'Brigit Jones' either... ;)

"Hats off to the first deer for uprooting a tree though - I wouldn't have thought they were that strong."

They've been training for that animal uprising that we all fear...

"This Disney-esque view of wild animals underpins the madness that is the current UK public approach to wildlife. "

You'd expect better from a so-called 'animal expert', though, wouldn't you?

Or does everyone aspire to be Johnny Morris these days, instead of David Attenborough?