Thursday, 10 June 2010

Until The Pips Squeak….

The government's planned spending squeeze will throw 750,000 public sector workers on to the dole queue and push unemployment close to 3 million for the first time since the early 1990s, a respected thinktank warns today.
Going to get worse before it gets better…
The warning comes as the employers' organisation the CBI today demands that the public sector should bear the brunt of budget cuts expected to be announced by the chancellor, George Osborne, in his emergency budget on Tuesday week.
Since they’ve grown at the expense of everything else, that seems fair.
The warning by the CIPD, not seen as a party political thinktank, underlines the dilemma faced by the government as its efforts to cut the deficit may lead to higher unemployment and then a higher benefits bill.
Not if they cut that too…

The figures were leapt on by the TUC general secretary, Brendan Barber, who said the coalition was in danger of damaging the economy and increasing the north-south divide.

"Northern regions depend more on public sector jobs, and staff who lose their jobs will find it harder to get new ones."

Hey, if they are too dim for the private sector, why are we (the taxpayer) picking up the bill?

6 comments:

John R said...

Dont know if Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development have their nose in the trough, if they do....chop!

I would bet that the TUC are getting money through the dodgy "union modernisation" deal McNutter set up.....chop!

Plenty more targets for cuts before we even get to public sector jobs.

Anonymous said...

How is some useless tosser earning 80K being binned and then instead costing us 65 quid per week more costly?

Anonymous said...

Given their current level of work, I would say most of them were on the dole already.

Brian, follower of Deornoth said...

Q. What do you call 750,000 public-sector employees floating face-down in the channel?

A. A good start.

Shug Niggurath said...

The public sector ends up growing because of the way it operates, no need to be efficient, just get a part-timer in to help who then ends up full time.

Then the local skills of the employable end up weighted to public sector tasks (or the ones they claim at least), so social care jobs, 'outreach', youth work and so on.

So if you as a business owner look to those areas to see if you can operate profitably there you realise you'd need to spend a small fortune retraining them. And why would you bother?

JuliaM said...

"I would bet that the TUC are getting money through the dodgy "union modernisation" deal McNutter set up..."

Oh, that's pretty much a foregone conclusion.

"How is some useless tosser earning 80K being binned and then instead costing us 65 quid per week more costly?"

With the civil service, you need to factor in the inevitable pension costs.

"The public sector ends up growing because of the way it operates, no need to be efficient, just get a part-timer in to help who then ends up full time."

Yes, I've friends in some branches who say that it rife. And 'hiring freezes' are often honoured more in the breach than in the observance.