Monday, 29 August 2016

Sounds Familiar....

There is also a feeling among some members that the merger reflects a more centralised and corporate approach to the running of the London-based charity that has left it out of touch with the wishes of many of its ordinary members.
Hmmm, where have we seen that before? Let's see, RSPCA, NSPCC, etc.

But they reckoned without the sort of people who usually volunteer for this.
Hazel Kingswood, chair of the Aylsham, Norfolk women’s section branch, who has been a legion volunteer for 34 years, said the charity had alienated thousands of women though its mishandling of the proposed merger.
“We are all volunteers,” she said. “When [the charity] starts telling us what we have got to do, we will not stand for that kind of dictatorship.
“If I wasn’t so angry I would sit down and weep. I have got women in their 80s and 90s who feel completely demoralised by what has happened.”
She said the Aylsham branch would now set up as a separate group and fundraise for other local armed forces charities: “It is not looking good for the Royal British Legion: they have shot themselves in the foot.
Bravo, Mrs Kingswood!
The charity says the merger is essential if it is to comply with regulation and governance requirements, cut costs, and focus resources on beneficiaries.
Its proposals were strongly opposed by the legion’s women’s section annual conference in April, while a subsequent members’ conference ordered the legion’s board of trustees to review its plans.
But a legion spokesman said it would be pressing ahead with the plan to close down the women’s section despite all the protests.
I bet they haven't heard the last of this, somehow.

And now I've got yet another charity to add to the list of those not getting my money...

4 comments:

Woman on a Raft said...

Upon the subject of ex-service folk and their struggles: I did some quick googling to establish how many charities are supposed to be preventing hardship. It is astonishing, and this is not an exhaustive list:

https://www.ctp.org.uk/resettlement-guides/charities-396677

The top list gives the main ones, but scroll down and click on the specific tabs and there are at least 70 charities plus another 10 or so just to do with housing.

As there are relatively few service personnel now there every single one of them should be eligible for a care package which means they do not end up on the streets even if they have problems which require long-term support.

What exactly is happening to the millions of pounds involved? Are these charities or are they monasteries, being inward looking and determined to build their own finery while using millions of dead and disabled people as promotional items.

Tim Newman said...

I don't regularly give to charity on the principle that I have no idea how the money will be used. Instead, I give fairly generously every now and again to a cause which I think is worthy at the time. I gave some money to Help for Heroes when that particular charity was doing a lot to help military guys (of whom I know several, one of who has benefited personally), and recently I gave a chunk of money to a particular hospice which had done a very good job of making a friend comfortable in the last two weeks of his life. At least I could see that in both of these cases the charity was actually providing benefits to those it says it is trying to help.

Andrew Scarborough said...

I reckon that this is PC based. Separate men's and women's sections are no longer permitted. Many bowls clubs have been compelled to abolish men's and women's matches and competitions simply to qualify for Lottery or Sports Foundation funding. Much to the chagrin of both many men and women. When people and organisations cannot organise themselves as they would wish we have lost important freedoms. Women's clubs, men's clubs, puff's clubs, whatever; folk want to associate with whom they wish. Nobody should take my money then tell with whom and how I should spend my life. The Royal British Legion should "do an RNLI" and tell the gummint to go combine sex and travel.

JuliaM said...

"..there are at least 70 charities plus another 10 or so just to do with housing. "

That's a hell of a list! The only ones I'm familiar with are BLESMA, Combat Stress and Help for Heroes.

"At least I could see that in both of these cases the charity was actually providing benefits to those it says it is trying to help."

Yes, that's my criteria too. It's getting so my list has rather shrunk in the last few years, though.

"I reckon that this is PC based. Separate men's and women's sections are no longer permitted."

I suspect you could well be right...