Saturday, 14 April 2018

That's Not Illegal. Yet.

No doubt it would be if this so-called 'journalist' had her way:
These men are not rapists, but they are guilty of vile misogyny.
Doesn't matter. That's not something you can be banged up for. No matter how much you harpies screech. 
This was a high-profile trial in which the woman who had accused them of rape had her bloodied knickers passed around a courtroom, in which the taxi driver who took her home told of her sobbing, and her distressed texts were also read out.
Otherwise known as 'presenting evidence in the case'. What, did you think all she'd have to do was make the accusation?

It turned out the evidence was pretty unpersuasive, too. 
The jury unanimously acquitted these men of rape. Their friends Blane McIlroy and Rory Harrison were unanimously found not guilty of indecent exposure and of perverting the course of justice. None of these men did anything illegal. Yet they are now fighting in a different court: the court of public opinion.
No, it's the court of pressure groups and feminist whackjobs opinion. The vast majority of the public couldn't care one jot. The justice system has been used, and that's an end to it.
This week a full-page advertisement has been taken out in the Belfast Telegraph by supporters of Jackson and Olding, asking that their suspension from Ulster and Ireland rugby duties be lifted.
And why not? They are not guilty. Their behaviour may be distasteful, but it does take two to tango.

Much as in the Chad Evans case, what did she think she was going back to their rooms for, tea and sandwiches with the crusts cut off, and a game of cribbage? 
To bring Jackson and Olding back on to the rugby field now, as their supporters are demanding, would appear to endorse what looks like degrading behaviour. This would hardly be the first time such a thing has happened. But how do we teach the boys who admire and emulate sportsmen to respect women if this is how their role models conduct themselves? Talking after his acquittal about the risks of mixing alcohol and sex, Ched Evans said he had been “young” and “stupid” at the time.
All participants in these cases can be said to be young and stupid. And often under the influence of various substances. 

Why should that be a mitigating factor for the goose, but a damning one for the gander?

6 comments:

Hector Drummond, Vile Novelist said...

The feminists now seem to think that the sexual revolution was only for women, not men.

Libertarian said...

"Misogeny is not a crime". But wouldn't she love it if it were.

Ted Treen said...

Feminism is little more than renamed misandry.

Longrider said...

That said, their continued suspension may be justified due to their behaviour being deemed to bring their sport into disrepute and the governing body are perfectly entitled to do that - their gaff, their rules applying of course.

Andrew Scarborough said...

You've got it right there Ted.

JuliaM said...

"The feminists now seem to think that the sexual revolution was only for women, not men."

"Everything on MY terms, even if contradictory. I am woman, hear me tie myself in knots..."

"But wouldn't she love it if it were."

She'll be cheering for it. Using the Minassian case in Toronto as leverage.

"Feminism is little more than renamed misandry."

It didn't start out that way. But that is surely what it's become.

"...their continued suspension may be justified due to their behaviour being deemed to bring their sport into disrepute and the governing body are perfectly entitled to do that ..."

If it's written into their contract, yes. But like Tim Newman, I'd really like to see that challenged more often.