Monday, 26 April 2010

Police Take Aim And Shoot Themselves In The Foot…

yet again:
Police stormed an innocent Wimbledon man’s home dragging him away in handcuffs in front of his five-year-old son.
Well, mistakes happen…
He said he was told he had impersonated a police officer and burgled a house in Hertfordshire after his fingerprints – copies of which had been taken more than 20 years ago for a minor offence for which he was cautioned – were found on its front door.

It transpired he had been at the property days earlier to conduct a survey and was at a party in Oxfordshire with his wife and 300 guests when the alleged crime happened.
So, the arrest was needless (if they’d done a bit of homework, or questioned him before not paying £200, not passing ‘Go’ and going straight to arrest, but an apology and a ride back to his home should be enough for any reasonable person to…

Oh, FFS..!
Officers apologised for the mistake and finally let him go more than seven hours after the arrest.

But they still insisted he catch a train back to Wimbledon and pay for the £12 ticket out of his own pocket.
Is there no-one with a grasp of the impending PR disaster that that would cause? Never mind some basic human decency?

11 comments:

Mike said...

four letters: IPCC
My local neighbourhood watch representative resident is not much better, He 'patrols' believing that his position gives him the power to do pretty much anything, lol. Last summer me and my neighbour let of a few fireworks in my back garden enjoying a beer or six. He turned up wailing about some old lady who lived down the road who was worried that the sky was falling in. We both looked him up and down and said take you car off my property or I will disable it, sell it and buy more fireworks with the proceeds. Funny what a uniform, badge and/or label does to people init?!?

Macheath said...

One wonders how much this cost - and how much paperwork it generated - and how much extra a ride home would have added.

However, I believe it is a truth universally acknowledged that the police never give anyone a lift if they can help it.

A relative of mine left work late one evening to find her car - and phone - had been stolen. The police turned up, took all the details then drove off, leaving her alone in an empty, closed park-and-ride at 11pm.

TDK said...

Off topic

You might like this Julia

re: the smacking ban

"The UK is one of the countries that has not yet implemented a full ban. In part, this is because the traditional parent-child relationship in the UK is one of authority [and] state intervention into family affairs is still not welcome," she added.

Dangerouslysubversivedad said...

This is what happens when they keep records on so many people that multiple fingerprint or DNA sets on file can start cropping up at the scene of ANY crime...

DerekP said...

The burglar wasn't the only one impersonating a police officer.

And they'll be like that with DNA evidence as well - "ooh, computer says 'YES', job done, Sarge."

John R said...

They are no longer "my" police force but are a pro-NuLieBore para-military force primarily there to protect the state and not the public. The local Police Authorities are part of the policial game and do nothing to redress the balance.

Until we get democratically elected police chiefs (Sherrifs?) the public will be seen merely as sheep, there to be harried and hassled at will with no power to bite back.

Brian, follower of Deornoth said...

They can tell he was impersonating a police officer from a fingerprint?

Mike said...

nee naa, nee naa, nee naa, lol

John Pickworth said...

"Yet again"

Yes it seems to be a common theme doesn't it?

What is really worrying is that they sent 5 'non-uniformed' officers and then refused to tell the man why they were arresting him. Actions which wouldn't be out of place in North Africa or the Middle East!

And yet, a police spokespuppet responds: "“We take all complaints very seriously..."

No they don't.

I can promise you, they'll behave this way again tomorrow, the day after and the week after that. Any pretence that they act in anyone's interest but for their own or their political masters has long gone.

JuliaM said...

"My local neighbourhood watch representative resident is not much better, He 'patrols' believing that his position gives him the power to do pretty much anything..."

Oh, great. And iDave wants more of him....

*sigh*

"One wonders how much this cost - and how much paperwork it generated - and how much extra a ride home would have added."

I wouldn't be surprised. But then, I expect the complaint will engender far, far more...

"You might like this Julia"

Oh, indeed! It's nice to know we're resisting something that issues from the EU.

But I bet we give up in the end...

"What is really worrying is that they sent 5 'non-uniformed' officers and then refused to tell the man why they were arresting him. "

He claims he wasn't read his rights too...

David Gillies said...

The cops have broken the social contract. Therefore impeding them in the execution of their duties to the full extent allowed by law is now a moral duty. At bare minimum, no formal interaction with the police should be unaccompanied by legal representation.