Friday, 20 August 2010

Huh..?!?

Now, I know why Tesco make such huge profits:



We thought 'OK, well, maybe some of the others are more expensive'. And the first of the others that we saw was the Gaymers cider at ... £3.

No saving, but at least, no loss...

Oh, well. At least there were no obvious spelling errors. As WoaR pointed out on that thread, their arithmatic is indeed suspect.

7 comments:

Smoking Hot said...

Look out for maths errors at the checkout, preferably the self-service ones.

Pack of 4 Duracell AA batteries £3 or 2 packs for £4. So l got 4 pks and self-service checkout brought it up as 4 pks for £2!

Paid, went out and put shopping in car and then came back and emptied shelf! Happy days!

Clarissa said...

Having spotted such mistakes in the past I always now check. However it isn't just limited to so called 'special offers' either as I've noticed that if they stock two items in different weights it isn't always cheaper to buy the heavier one.

Still, I'm sure it is great way of making money out of the less observant.

Richard said...

Niquitin mint lozenges - special offer, 36 for £5, or 72 for £11.

At least Tesco put the unit price in small print on the labels, so you can check without bringing a Cray mainframe with you in your trolley. It isn't hard to spot the best deal: just ignore the big numbers and read the small ones. But in post-Labour Britain, how many have the skills or inclination to do that? After all, 'shopping's so expensive, innit?'

Peter Risdon said...

I've blogged a couple of these 2 for the price of things in the past. I think they're deliberately trading on innumeracy, because (I'm afraid) I've always done the mental maths with such offers and they never used to operate like this, before a few years ago. This is a tangible sign of dumbed-down education.

Chalcedon said...

My wife went to Asda. Bought a huge amount of stuff (about 6 bags plus 6 bottles of reasonable wine) and the lot cost £84. Tesco is more expensive!

JuliaM said...

"Paid, went out and put shopping in car and then came back and emptied shelf! Happy days!"

:D

"...it isn't just limited to so called 'special offers' either as I've noticed that if they stock two items in different weights it isn't always cheaper to buy the heavier one."

Ah, yes! That would be the automatic assumption, wouldn't it?

"...in post-Labour Britain, how many have the skills or inclination to do that?"

It's no wonder the Tesco chairman was so disparaging of the skills of his workforce...

"I think they're deliberately trading on innumeracy..."

It's the perfect 'crime'. How could you ever prove it?

"My wife went to Asda. Bought a huge amount of stuff (about 6 bags plus 6 bottles of reasonable wine) and the lot cost £84."

Yes, and despite the boss's gaffe yesterday, Asda quality is always pretty good, I've always found.

Roue le Jour said...

"I've noticed that if they stock two items in different weights it isn't always cheaper to buy the heavier one."

May I just hear, hear that.

I tackled my local supermarket manager about exactly that, why was the regular price of 250gms of spread more than than twice that of the 125gms?

Because head office say so, was the predictable reply. Hard not to see it as cynical exploitation of the busy shopper's natural assumption that bulk is cheaper.