Friday, 22 October 2010

So, What Should Be Done With The Likes Of Rory Fagan?

After hearing the 21-year-old thug had learning difficulties and an alcohol problem, Judge Peter Moss said: ‘Put the two together and he becomes a lethal cocktail.

'He can appear very frightening.’
He’s a violent mugger – he is ‘very frightening’ to those he attacks.
He went on: ‘I can envisage you in 21 years’ time still drinking and committing this sort of offending again and again.’

But despite this, the judge gave Fagan a community sentence, saying: ‘He’s not a well lad.

'Prison is just the wrong place.’
He’s not bad, according to m’learned friend, but he’s not mad enough for hospital. So where does he go? Back out onto the streets, of course!
The judge added that he was ‘taking a leap of faith’ and that he hoped his prediction for Fagan’s future did not come true.
But hey, if it does, it’s unlikely to be you or your children he mugs, is it?

6 comments:

Henry Crun said...

Fagan ay? I'm surprised the judge didn't blame it on genetics.

Anonymous said...

prison would be the right place for him if he could be protected from bieng a victim of crime, which i doubt. he clearly does need locking up for a short period if for nothing other than to break the cycle of alcohol abuse. most of us realise when we start drinking too much and react acordingly but those of us with problems like his cannot.

so once he's been clean/dry for a few months then its upto so called profesionals to address his mental needs to become a productive member of society, yeah, fat chance.

so in the real world lets just round up all the mentaly disturbed people who have failed in using booze to calm the nerves and ollowed it to futher thier problems, the concequence of which is innocent victims. let's round them up and have a bonfire, simply because i can't be bothered with anyone else and am too short sighted to see that people have different needs to me which left unaddressed enevitably impact on me or someone like me.

MTG said...

Hopeless governments share the common ingredient of electorate abandonment. UK citizens should not be surprised to find themselves debating the wisdom of state actions that return violent criminals to our streets, when it is in the best interests of a behemoth CJS and an army of well paid lawyers to do just that.

That this type of violent offender is ever on the loose is totally unacceptable when there is a certainty of generating more victims. It is a huge risk thrust upon all of us and a terrible position for anyone left with no choice but to defend themselves, their loved ones or property to the extent of killing a violent criminal of diminished reasoning.

Appalling beast I am to so much as contemplate WW2 solutions, our own cowardice and negligence leaves a future generation biting the bullet on eugenics, unpalatable surgery and voluntary euthanasia.

David Gillies said...

The abandonment of the law-abiding to the predators by the ruling classes is going to backfire very badly. It is societally corrosive to a degree which those in charge have little conception. They don't understand that as with all contracts, the social contract has two signatories, and if one of them abrogates the terms, the contract is void. As it stands, the powers-that-be have let the side down so badly that if I catch a burglar in my house and I have the means to hand, he will die miserably. I am unable to count on the judicial system to prevent my further victimisation, so field-expedient solutions are all that is to hand.

Brian, follower of Deornoth said...

Prison is the right place - for perjuring scum like Mr "Justice" Moss.

JuliaM said...

"I'm surprised the judge didn't blame it on genetics."

Heh!

"...then its upto so called profesionals to address his mental needs to become a productive member of society, yeah, fat chance."

Thanks to the do-gooders in society, you won't find many services for people like that, and they can no longer be forced to take advantage of them, if they don't want to.

And besides, you are assuming that he really HAS 'learning difficulties'. As opposed to being a nasty little sod.

"It is a huge risk thrust upon all of us..."

Indeed. For once, I'd like to see the judge/magistrate/probation staff take that risk along with the rest of us.

"As it stands, the powers-that-be have let the side down so badly that if I catch a burglar in my house and I have the means to hand, he will die miserably."

Remember: one to the chest, then two warning shots in the air.. ;)