Friday, 28 January 2011

What’s A Word Worth?

Ruby Thomas, aged 19, and Joel Alexander were sentenced at the Old Bailey today after previously being found guilty of the manslaughter of 62-year-old Mr Baynham.

Thomas, who lived in Bourdon Road in Crystal Palace before moving to Lichfield after Mr Baynham’s death, was sentenced to seven years in a young offenders institute.

Alexander, of Talbot Road in Thornton Heath, was given six years, also in a young offenders institute.
Hang on! He was the one who physically assaulted the victim, leading to the death – why does he get a year less?

Well, according to Judge Richard Hawkins:
He said he had sentenced Thomas to a year more than Alexander because her homophobic comment to Mr Baynham was an aggravating factor.
So, that’s what a word is worth. An extra year’s jail.

Only if it’s the right word, of course.

6 comments:

Mr Grumpy said...

Or looking at it another way, we now know the official exchange rate in our equal and inclusive Brave New World. Seven straight lives will buy you six gay lives. It's like a bad dream.

Gordo said...

Could it perhaps be because Joel is a, em well, you know. I'd better not say it, I might get sent to prison.
PS if you don't know what I mean hit google images with their names.

mitchell-images said...

Ive got a few words I'd like to say to them but I better not.

http://mitchell-images-blog.blogspot.com/

William said...

Coming hard on the heels of some certifiable lady judge who 'ruled' shouting at someone is abuse this decision shows the judiciary are now neck and neck with the politicians in the race to be the first to be strung up across the lamp posts of Britain.

MTG said...

We plebs know our place looking up at the privileged - which must include a future view from the bottom of lamp posts, William.
Our judges have oozed through the gates of public schools, polished in the art of fagging boorish oiks.

JuliaM said...

"...we now know the official exchange rate in our equal and inclusive Brave New World."

Indeed!

"...this decision shows the judiciary are now neck and neck with the politicians in the race to be the first to be strung up across the lamp posts of Britain."

At the moment, it's getting quite hard to tell who is doing the most damage, isn't it?