Friday, 12 June 2015

Union Members: Dumber Than Tree Stumps

The industrial walk-outs, which started back in March, were effectively brought to an end today, with 76 of the 106 GMB members agreeing terms to return to work.
Yup, this strike is finally over. Not a total surrender, but close enough.
Although the latter two unions agreed terms including a one-off £500 payment for each worker at the end of April, GMB members continued strike action which had been due to end at the end of this week.
While 30 drivers are yet to return, Cllr Dominic Twomey insists the borough’s waste and refuse services are “fully operational” once more, though it will take two weeks to catch up with the back-log.
And has it been worth it? Reader, it has not…
Although other council staff had been recruited to deliver the borough’s green garden waste collection service during the disruption, Cllr Twomey also revealed a further six drivers had been hired on short-term contracts last week.
While the newly-returned GMB drivers have accepted the same terms as agreed by Unison and Unite workers five weeks ago, the borough’s finance member believes staff were brought around by the recent lack of earnings.
“I am sure they realised it’s a fair deal,” he added. “Unfortunately some of the drivers have lost quite a lot of income.
“While the GBM members have been striking it’s actually cost them more than they could have gained.”
Ahahahahahahaha!

4 comments:

The Stigler said...

Unions only really worked in the industrial era when employers had little choice of workers and employees had little choice of jobs (because of the cost of transportation).

Once you got to the late 70s and cars as good as the Ford Escort, the rules changed. Employers can find some freelancers to fill in if people went on strike and strikers could not win. On the flip side, employees could go and work somewhere across town if they didn't like it where they were.

There's still a few unionised private workplaces, but they're generally older companies with lots of specialist roles like Rolls-Royce. Places where you can't easily get another job, and where employers can't easily get more people.

Lynne at Counting Cats said...

Strike while the peelings rot. Because that same strategy worked so well back in 1979...

Anonymous said...

Unions are working hard for their members in Los Angeles too

Although the union-funded Raise the Wage campaigned so vociferously in favor of a $15.25 minimum wage, unions are seeking exemptions from the higher wages for their members. The exemption, or escape clause, would allow them greater strength in organizing workplaces. Unions can tell fast food chains, hotels, and hospitals that if they agree to union representation, their wage bill will be substantially lower. That will persuade employers to allow the unions to move in.

http://www.economics21.org/commentary/unions-exempt-themselves-minimum-wage-hikes-05-28-2015

Of course, union members will have to pay subs to achieve these lower wages.

JuliaM said...

"There's still a few unionised private workplaces, but they're generally older companies with lots of specialist roles like Rolls-Royce. Places where you can't easily get another job, and where employers can't easily get more people."

Unions, however, thrive in the public sector. Like dinosaurs escaping the asteroid strike...

"Because that same strategy worked so well back in 1979..."

Indeed. It didn't get quite that bad this time. But it could have done.

"Of course, union members will have to pay subs to achieve these lower wages."

/facepalm