Friday, 10 April 2015

Try This If You Ever Manage To Get A Job…

…I think you’ll find your boss won’t be as easy to convince:
A teenage rebellion in Runcorn achieved a partial victory today as The Grange agreed to a temporary reprieve over its ban on wearing charity badges on their blazers.
A school spokeswoman confirmed on Tuesday that pupils would be allowed to don their ribbons and Marie Curie daffodils until a permanent resolution comes about.
In a letter sent out to parents today, head of school Barry Carney said he was 'suspending the rule' because of the amount of 'disruption' to learning.
Well, good for you, kids! Bathe in the glory of your victory over being told what to wear. Just don't think that'll cut any ice in the world of work, eh?
Lily Gaynor, student, rang the ECHO's sister paper the Runcorn and Widnes Weekly News from ‘isolation’ where she and about 20 others were being kept to give firsthand details of their mass detention.
She was even asked by a teacher to end the call as she tried to provide information about the classes’ struggle.
'Her struggle'..? Why, she's like Martin Luther King, isn't she?

8 comments:

Flaxen Saxon said...

As I recall, 'Uniform Rules' were always enforced by a sound thrashing at Tipton Secondary Modern. If you were lucky, nurse Mandy (sans uniform) would administer punishment. I never wore my uniform.

Bucko The Moose said...

Kids are stupid

James Higham said...

Lily Gaynor - Mitzi Gaynor's granddaughter?

Longrider said...

Er, don't assume it will be different. The law regarding dress codes requires the policy to be written down and clearly communicated. And, preferably consulted. All too often, employers forget this little nicety.

When my employer decided arbitrarily that my hair needed cutting they found out the hard way, they cannot do that. They had no dress code, it wasn't written down and as such, they had no power to enforce it. So rebellion worked. Besides, my body, my rules apply. What I wear can be dictated, My body cannot and I don't compromise on that one. My agreement with a client or employer is an exchange of expertise and time for money. The length of my hair is my business, not theirs. If they don't like it, don't engage me, but do not, ever, tell me how long it should be. Not if you want a polite response ;)

Lord T said...

I wonder what course she is doing. Something solid that will get her a good job or something like advanced flower arranging?

Anonymous said...

It's Rosa Parkes all over again!

Greencoat said...

Martin Luther King's 'struggle' meant heaving his kegs back on after giving his latest mistress a good seeing-to and then getting to church in time to deliver his latest sermon.

JuliaM said...

"Er, don't assume it will be different. The law regarding dress codes requires the policy to be written down and clearly communicated. And, preferably consulted. All too often, employers forget this little nicety."

Because they are employers?

And because YOU choose to work for THEM, and not the other way around?

"I wonder what course she is doing."

I don't think it's engineering...